About Matt.mmwine

Sommelier, wine writer, and overall Motor Mouth, I appear on various TV shows, host local wine events, and write about wine, food, cocktails, family & more!
Website: http://agoodtimewithwine.com
Matt.mmwine has written 198 articles so far, you can find them below.

About Matt.mmwine

Sommelier, wine writer, and overall Motor Mouth, I appear on various TV shows, host local wine events, and write about wine, food, cocktails, family & more!

Find more about me on:

Here are my most recent posts

Nine Wines For Your Thanksgiving Feast

Wines to Pair with a Happy Thanksgiving

Wines to Pair with a Happy Thanksgiving

It’s a scant few days before Thanksgiving, have you finalized your menu yet? Of course you have, and you’ve paired the perfect wine with the meal, right? Well, most wine writers and sommeliers will argue that there is no ONE wine that works perfectly for Thanksgiving. I’ve written about pairing wine with Thanksgiving meals before, as well as brought three wines for Thanksgiving to CBS 12, and maintain that the variety of palates your guests have and range of flavors at Thanksgiving calls for a variety of wines to be served with your Turkey. While there are some “typical or classic wine and Turkey Day pairings”, and I’ll cover them below, there are some addition wine pairing options that you may not have considered. I’ll summarize where I bought the wines and their prices at the end of the article. However, first, let’s take a look at nine different wines, some the same grape from different regions, to offer you some great Thanksgiving wine pairing ideas.

Chandon Brut Classic Sparkling Wine For Thanksgiving

Chandon Brut Classic Sparkling Wine For Thanksgiving

If there is one thing you can safely serve at any party or big meal, it’s sparkling wine. There are of course tons of options, a true Champagne from France,  Prosecco from Italy, Cava from Spain, or California bubbly like Chandon’s Brut Classic. A non-vintage (NV), budget friendly sparkling wine at $13, there are great flavors of green apples, peach, and a little toasted bread. These flavors work perfectly with appetizers, including cheese, fruit and even stuffed mushrooms. Champagne and sparkling wine love salty snacks, so salted nuts and even pigs in a blanket work perfectly. This is a slightly more fruit forward option, and if you like a traditional Champagne, feel confident that it’s a perfecting wine selection for Thanksgiving as well!

Chateau Megyer Tokjai Furmint 2012

Chateau Megyer Tokjai Furmint 2012

Chances are, you’ll surprise your guests with a wine from Hungary, made with a grape they’ve likely never heard of. Tokaji, pronounced Toke-eye, is a wine that can be dry or sweet, and made with one of six approved grapes: Furmint, Harslevelu, Yellow Muscat (Sargamuskotaly) Zeta, Koverszolo, and Kabar. The Chateau Megyer Tokaji Furmint 2012  is a budget friendly dry white wine option at $12. A light, clear yellow color and subdued nose leads to a palate that is reminiscent of riesling. Flavors of soft apricot, coupled with good minerality, this white wine will pair well with appetizers, as well as your turkey.  The sweet versions of Tokjai, Aszu or Eszencia, are perfect dessert wines. They are sweet enough wines to pair with the fruit pies that are common desserts at Thanksgiving.

DeBeaune Les Galopieres 2011 Pouilly-Fuisse wine for thanksgiving

DeBeaune Les Galopieres 2011 Pouilly-Fuisse

Chardonnay is a grape grown the world over. The wine can be lean and mineral driven, tropical fruit focused, or full of apple and pear ‘tree fruit’ flavors. The French styles of chardonnay are typically less focused on the burst of fruit flavors you’ll find in California wines. Additionally, if there is oak used to age the wine, it’s much more subdued than it’s California cousins. Pouilly-Fuissé is an appellation (AOC) for white wine in the Mâconnais subregion of Burgundy in central France. Pronounced Poo-Wee Foo-Say, Pouilly-Fuisse only permits chardonnay to make wine bearing the AOC’s designation. Though there is often oak aging involved with these wines, the $20 DeBeaune Les Galopieres Pouilly-Fuisse 2011 is unoaked. A lean, crisp white wine with flavors of green apples, minerals, and a beautiful finish of spice and smoke, this is a perfect all around wine for Thanksgiving. It will work nicely with your appetizers, your vegetables, your turkey and even your ham.

Sonoma-Loeb Chardonnay 2011 wine for thanksgiving

Sonoma-Loeb Chardonnay 2011

Another great $20 white wine selection is the Sonoma-Loeb Chardonnay 2011. A perfect wine to pair with ham, turkey, potato and stuffing, this oaked chardonnay has notes of vanilla and creme brulee, with a dominant fruit flavor of pear. There is a soft smoke and spice on the finish, but all of the flavors are balanced and none overwhelms the others.

Domaine Pignard 2011 Beaujolais wine for thanksigiving

Domaine Pignard 2011 Beaujolais

Beaujolais is not a revolutionary wine pairing idea for Thanksgiving. There is no doubt you’ve heard of Beaujolais Nouveau. However, it’s not the best expression of gamay, and it’s more a marketing ploy than anything else. It is not a wine I recommend or partake in. However, gamay grapes make fantastic wines, and the Domaine Pignard Beaujolais 2011 is a steal at $10. An easy drinking, fruit forward red wine, the DeBeaune Domaine Pignard Beaujolais is a great idea for Thanksgiving, as it will pair with fowl or meat. A soft palate, with flavors of dried fruits like blackberry and bing cherry, there’s a hint of oak as well. There is good acidity, which makes it a great food friendly wine. I did also try a Cru Beaujolais, the Domaine Mont Chavy 2011 Morgon. Less fruity and more earthy, this was another great French wine under $20.

Forever 2012 Pinot Noir wine for Thanksgiving

Forever 2012 Pinot Noir

I’m not the first wine writer/sommelier to recommend Pinot Noir wine for your Thanksgiving meal. I do, however, try to find new and exciting options for you to try. Like Chardonnay, Pinot Noir is found the world over. This year, my pinot noir Thanksgiving wine comes from California and Oregon, to highlight two different styles. Forever Vineyards Pinot Noir 2012 is a budget friendly $11 option. A nose of fresh berries, the palate is a mocha and strawberry mix with a hint of spice. Pork and Pinot are a favorite wine pairing, but of course turkey will work perfectly.

Domaine Loubejac Willamette 2010 thanksgiving wine

Domaine Loubejac Willamette 2010 thanksgiving wine

While tasting Clos Pepe Pinot Noir with winemaker Wes Hagen, he mentioned how Oregon winemakers are similar to their Burgundian counterparts. Domaine Loubejac offers a Willamette Valley Pinot Noir for $18 that certainly reminds me of French Burgundy. Dried strawberry and raspberry, with a nice spice on the mid palate and finish, the Domaine Loubejac Willamette 2010 has great acidity and is very food friendly. Your Thanksgiving turkey or ham will enjoy this wine. Feel free to pick up a bottle of Wes Hagen’s Clos Pepe 2009 Pinot Noir as well. At $54, the Clos Pepe 2009 is a well made red wine that will work perfectly with your 2013 Thanksgiving, or sit in your cellar and age nicely until 2010. I’ll feature the 2010 Clos Pepe Pinot Noir in an upcoming article.

Dr Loosen 2012 Blue Slate thanksgiving wine

Dr Loosen 2012 Blue Slate thanksgiving wine

I don’t drink a lot of riesling. It’s not that I don’t enjoy it, and I’ve tasted a few German Rieslings this year that I really enjoyed. I just don’t reach for them frequently. I’ve recommended the wines from Dr Loosen previously, and will again say that riesling is a great Thanksgiving wine selection. The Dr Loosen Dr L Riesling is a bargain at $12. A perfect wine pairing for ham, turkey, fruit and cheese, the Dr L has fresh apricot and peach flavors with a very subtle minerality through it. For a more mineral and slate focused palate, the Dr Loosen Blue Slate (pictured left) is an excellent riesling selection as well, and cost only $22. It has enough white peach fruit and floral flavor to balance the flinty minerality that is typical from blue slate soils the vines are planted on.

We have already mentioned nine, well ten wines to serve with your Thanksgiving meal. However, I recently participated in a tasting of Bordeaux Superieur wine under $15 that had some real great selections. These samples were the second part of the Planet Bordeaux wine series I had previously participated in.  You may think a merlot from Bordeaux would be too overpowering for your Thanksgiving meal. However, the Les Hautes de Lagarde Bordeaux is bound to change your mind.

Les Hauts De Lagarde Bordeaux 2011 merlot wine for thanksgiving

Les Hauts De Lagarde Bordeaux 2011

I’ll feature the entire six wine Bordeaux tasting in a future article, but the Les Hautes de Lagarde Bordeaux 2011 was my favorite of the flight. An organic Bordeaux red wine that cost only $12, the Les Hauts de Lagarde is a blend of 65% merlot and 25% cabernet sauvignon. Flavors of blueberry and black currant with nice oak integration lend themselves to this soft, elegant red wine. There was a hint of spice on the finish that brought all of the flavors together nicely. A perfect wine to pair with beef, lamb, veal and pasta, it was light enough to enjoy with turkey, stuffing, and the rest of your Thanksgiving meal. As a side note, we decanted this wine for about 1 1/2 hours.

There are a few tips to keep in mind when serving these wines

  • Serve your white wines chilled, but not ice cold. Serving wine too cold mutes the flavors
  • Serve your red wines SLIGHTLY chilled. Room temperature for red is about 60 degrees, not your typical 75 house temperature
  • Decant your red wines for at least 30 minutes before serving. Chill it in the fridge for 30-40 minutes, then open and leave on the table 30 minutes before meal time
  • Don’t be afraid to decant your white wine. They’ll open up with a little air. Just keep them cool, perhaps in an ice bucket while doing so. Simply pull the cork and leave them open 15 minutes before serving.

I purchased all of the wines mentioned today, with the exception of the Les Hauts de Lagarde and the Clos Pepe Pinot Noir, which were media samples. They were all found easily, and you should be able to pick up one or more for your own party.

  • —Chandon Brut – Publix & Total Wine $13
  • Chateau Megyer Tokaji Furmint – Total Wine $12
  • DeBeaune Pouilly-Fuisse – Total Wine $20
  • —Sonoma Loeb Chardonnay – Publix & Total Wine $20
  • Domaine Pignard Beaujolais – Total wine $10
  • Forever Vineyards Pinot Noir – Total Wine $11
  • Domaine Loubejac Pinot Noir – Total Wine $18
  • Dr Loosen Dr L Riesling – Publix & Total Wine $12
  • Les Hautes de Lagarde Bordeaux – Whole Foods $12

Cheers to you and your friends and family this Thanksgiving season. I’d love to hear what your favorite wine is this Thanksgiving, and what dish you enjoy it with. Just leave a comment below!

Tasting Three Bordeaux Wines Under $20

Planet Bordeaux Wine tasting Three Bordeaux Wines Under $20

Three Bordeaux Wines Under $20

I believe many people in the US are afraid of French wine! I feel this fear is the product of three factors, the inability to pronounce the wine’s name easily, the inability to identify the grapes readily, and the inability to be comfortable with the previous two factors given lofty prices of some French wines. Of course, the first factor, the language, is the most difficult to get over. I’ll give you that one. The second factor is changing, and you’ll see that on at least one of the three wines below, the grape varieties are right on the front of the bottle. The last fear factor of price for French wine given the uncertainty of what’s in the bottle can be overcome by learning that nice French wine can be had for $12.

When I was asked to participate in a recent virtual wine tasting on Twitter by the team at Planet Bordeaux, a group charged with educating consumers about wines from Bordeaux, I was of course interested. I’ve been doing these virtual wine tastings since 2008, and think they’re a great opportunity. It gives me the chance to try wines, and share the results with you. This increases both of our exposure to wines that perhaps we otherwise would not have tried. I knew this event, tasting three wines from Bordeaux, France under $20,  would be a hit.

Chateau de Bonhoste Bordeaux Blanc 2012 wine review

Chateau de Bonhoste Bordeaux Blanc 2012

The first wine of the evening was a crisp white wine from Chateau de Bonhoste, the 2012 Bordeaux Blanc with a suggested retail price (SRP) of only $12. A blend of three grapes, 60% Sauvignon Blanc, 30% Semillon and 10% Muscadelle, the wine is pale straw in color. It’s bouquet is a soft, pink grapefruit, light floral scents, and a touch of honey. The palate is light, crisp and refreshing. There is nice fruit on the approach, a blend of tree fruit, stone fruit and a good bit of grapefruit that comes and wraps itself around the other fruits quickly. The wine has nice acidity, firm and zippy. This is a pleasant, inexpensive white wine, especially if you like citrus and acidity. There is a little hint of spice that seems to come on the finish, rounding out a very nice palate. For $12, it’s definitely worth trying this value focused white wine from Bordeaux. For the record, you pronounce the name Chateau de Bone-oste.

Tasting notes on Chateau Bonnet 2012 Rose from Bordeaux, France wine review

Chateau Bonnet 2012 Rose from Bordeaux, France

The second wine of the evening was a rosé from Chateau Bonnet (Shah-toe Bone-nay) Bordeaux 2012. The wines of Chateau Bonnet are made by Vignobles Andre Lurton, where vines were first planted in 1744. Made with merlot and cabernet sauvignon, two of the most prominent grapes of Bordeaux, France, this simple rosé wine cost only $15. With a dark, rich pink color in the glass, the bouquet is soft strawberry with a spicy floral floating on top. The palate is light and very soft, this is a very relaxed, laid back wine. The fruit isn’t explosive, it’s subdued strawberry and a tiny bit of dried cranberry.  The wine was a tad soft and subtle, but did show a bit more power as it opened.

Chateau Majoureau Hyppos Bordeaux Superieur 2009 red wine

Chateau Majoureau Hyppos 2009

The third wine in this tasting was the Chateau Majoureau (mah-zhohr-oh) “Hyppos” Bordeaux Superieur 2009. A big, bold Bordeaux red wine with 55% merlot and 45% cabernet sauvignon, we decanted the Hyppos for over an hour, and sampled it every thirty minutes for over three hours. There were scents of dark black fruits on the nose, as well as a cedar box component and mixed spice scents. The palate is a lot like the nose – the cedar box and spice is powerful up front, the fruit is really hidden behind the rest of the tastes. Not a “sipping wine”, we paired this with a pot roast, and with the food there is a little more harmony to the Hyppos. However, ultimately, this wine was a bit big, with a zealous amount of oak showing, and it really didn’t have the finesse I was hoping to find. This is a $20 Bordeaux red wine that will appeal to those who really enjoy the nuances that bold oak gives to red wine.

Let’s get back to those three factors that I believe cause Americans to shy away from French wine: language, unable to discern the grapes in the bottle, and price. Again, there isn’t much I can do about the language. As a matter of fact, I had to reach out to the PR firm who supplied these wines as samples, to ensure I was pronouncing them right. I wasn’t, for the record. It’s a matter of learning a different language, to whatever extent you are comfortable with. However, the second item, the grapes in the bottle, that’s changing.

Chateau Lafite-Rothschild wine from Bordeaux, France

Chateau Lafite-Rothschild wine from Bordeaux, France

It used to be the case that unless you studied the wine regions of France, you had no idea what grapes made the wines. If you didn’t learn that Burgundy reds are largely pinot noir, and Bordeaux left bank is predominantly cabernet sauvignon while right bank is predominantly merlot, you had no idea what you were drinking. That, of course, could cause  someone very particular about what they’re drinking to steer clear of these enigmas. However, recent changes in french wine labeling laws are allowing the grape variety to be printed on the label. While you probably won’t see them on all of the wines of France any time soon, you’ll definitely see them more often. And, if you’re ever wondering what grapes are in a bottle, feel free to ask me! I’ll do my best to answer right way!

The last factor, the price of French wines being prohibitive, is likely no longer a concern. Sure, you’ve heard of Chateau Lafite-Rothschild going for hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. And I’m sure you’ve walked into a store and seen the bottle of Petrus for $2,500 and more. However, you’ve now seen how French wine can be found under $20.  There is a wide array of wines coming from France, and they span the price spectrum. And  I hope we can explore that wide world of wine together! Let me know the last French wine you had by leaving a comment below, as I’m very curious about your experiences!

Cheers!

Funk

Wine Music and Funk

Wine Music and Funk

Funk is all around us. It’s in music, as a funky bass line. It’s in wine, as the funky, barnyard scent found in some wines. And of course, it’s in our head. We all get into a funk from time to time. For some, it’s mere moments in a day, while for others, it can last weeks, months, even years. Some would say “Pick yourself up by the bootstraps and get on with it.” Yeah, thanks for that sage advice. Remind me to put you on the next suicide prevention call rotation. I don’t know if there is a sure fire way to break yourself out of a funk, but I’ll explain how I broke out of mine. However, before I talk about my funk, and why there’s been no content on the site for a while, I’m going to talk about the funk in wine.

There is no doubt that some wines just smell like funk. The wet band-aid or even barnyard scent can be subtle or strong, and you can love it, or hate it. I’m in the later camp, and really do not enjoy the scent when sipping wine.  The technical term for that funky smell is Brettanomyces, or Brett. It’s considered a flaw in wine, and while some people will hardly notice it, others, like me, are very sensitive to it and can smell it in a bottle is uncorked across the room. (Ok, slight exaggeration!) People can enjoy it, of course, feeling it adds complexity and a certain nuance of terroir (tehr-wah, French for the earth or where the wine is from, the locale and it’s essence). However, I’ve experienced first hand that funk is not always considered good.

Chateau Cantin in Saint Emilion, Bordeaux

Chateau Cantin in Saint Emilion, Bordeaux

I was in Bordeaux in April, and had the most amazing two days visiting the vineyards and a chateau or three. The last stop was Chateau Cantin, where my wife Robin and I met the winemaker, Mr. Vincent Cachau. Sipping on some of his wine, and enjoying small talk, I started to compliment him on the wine. I had said a number of complimentary things, but added the word “barnyard” to my notes. The winemaker’s reaction to the mention of “barnyard” is forever ingrained in my mind. He looked aghast, and took a sharp breath in. He said “No, really?” I said “Oh, not that funky barnyard, but more like an earthy, organic scent.” With relief, he said “Ah good, because the term for that barnyard is…” and he thought of how to say the word in English. “Brett, or Brettanomyces, and it’s terrible.” I offered. Smiling, he said “Brett, Yes. It’s a flaw. I hope you never experience it in my wines.” And we continued to sip happily.

Now, I am sure some people will disagree, stating that Bret is not a flaw, or they find it charming or interesting in a wine. And, I can clearly remember a tasting of some wine from St Joseph where the “barnyard” was tame, and it indeed was an interesting trait of the wine. However, as controlling the level of Brett produced making the wine is difficult, and guaranteeing those low levels is near impossible, Brett in wine is typically considered a flaw. All of that leads up to this: The next time you’re sipping on a wine, and you think you’re rolling around in Trigger’s barn stall after a wet day, don’t be ashamed to say the wine isn’t for you, and ask for something different. You don’t need to like that Funk!

In a Funk

In a Funk

Now, the funk in our head, that’s a flaw as well. Things can set us off, whether a life altering event or a minor change in our routine that throws us off. I have definitely been in a funk for the last year or so. My funk came about due to a number of odd factors, none terribly bad. My sister, who had been in the hospital since May 2011 and near death a few times, was finally doing well and getting ready to leave the hospital and go “home”. A good thing, you say – except family for me is sometimes stressful. While I was overjoyed with her health returning, the stress from logistically situating her was a bit overwhelming, especially regarding our extended family. Additionally, while work was good, I knew there was trouble brewing. A project or two was postponed or cancelled, ultimately ending in a 60 person layoff, which I was part of. Those factors, with a few other small things going on, added up to a funk that kept me from doing the things I enjoy, and just grinding day after day away.

So, how did I break out of the funk? I think getting laid off was part of it. After getting my resume together, and focusing on new opportunities, I started to get excited for the possibilities ahead of me. I started doing some more consulting in the wine field, which I absolutely love. I began networking with some great people, who helped me stay focused on the positive things. I also started to donate my time to a few charities that need my help, helping those who couldn’t help me. And, finally, after being together for eight years, Robin and I were able to get married, since we no longer worked together due to my layoff! All very little things that helped me get out of my own way and get back on track.

For me, I enjoy wine most when I’m sharing it with people. Therefore, I plan on getting back to sharing it more often with you. I may be sharing a few shorter posts at first, giving you some of the wines I’ve had recently, along with simple tasting notes. Once I get the words flowing again, we’ll get back to our regularly scheduled ramblings.

And all that said, I leave you with some GOOD funk….. Open up a big bold red, dim the lights, and let the bass transport you!

French Sparkling Wine and Champagne from $15 to $40

French Sparkling Wine And Champagne for New Years

French Sparkling Wine And Champagne for New Years

While New Year’s Eve is not the only time to pop a cork on some bubbly, it’s certainly the most popular night for it. If you were ever unsure of what to pour in your glass while you toast to the New Year, I’ve got you covered. I visited CBS 12 WPEC and brought three French sparkling wines that are affordable and delicious. Whether you prefer a true Champagne, or a more affordable Cremant d’Alsace or Cremant d’Bourgogne, these three options will delight you and your guests on New Year’s Eve or any time.

 

I have previously recommended Louis Bouillot Cremant de Bourgogne, as I feel it’s a French sparkling wine that offers great quality for the price. The Perle d’Aurore Brut Rose is a Burgundy wine made from 80% Pinot Noir & 20% Gamay, and is bottle fermented for at least 24 months, much longer than the legal requirement of 9 months. This enables the lees, or yeast used in fermentation, to add both aroma and complexity to the palate. I mention the flavor profile in the tv segment above, and for $15.99, I feel this is a bottle of bubbles to have on hand for any occasion that calls for a toast, such as making it through another Monday!

Louis Bouillot Perle d'Aurore Rosé Brut French Sparkling Wine

Louis Bouillot Perle d’Aurore Rosé Brut

The Albrecht family has been cultivating vineyards since as early as 1425, with major developments beginning in 1930 after the phylloxera crises. Lucien Albrecht lead the family estate and has been assisted by his son Jean Albrecht since 1980. Albrecht sparkling wines have been recommendations of mine previously, and I believe they continue to offer great quality for the price. At only $19.99, the Brut Reserve makes a great budget friendly alternative to Champagne.

Jean Albrecht Brut Reserve French Sparkling Wine

Jean Albrecht Brut Reserve French Sparkling Wine

While Eric Roby and I discussed that the French sparkling wines will be close to the Champagne in the above TV segment, there is still indeed a difference. Champagne is not only about a name, or the premium soils in which the grapes are grown. It’s about hundreds of years of tradition making only Champagne, focusing talents and honing the skill to produce a premium product. There are some amazing Champagne houses producing excellent bubblies, and Mailly is indeed one. Their vineyards are Grand Cru, some of the top quality soil to produce Champagne grapes. Made from 75% pinot noir and 25% chardonnay, this non-vintage Champagne is a combination of wines of one single crop, with reserve wines more than 10 years old. The blend then ages in French oak barrels up to 15 years old. The result is a dry, elegant sparkling wine that has beautiful notes of yellow apple with green apples on the finish. Elegant sophistication for only $38, which I purchased at my local Total Wine store.

Mailly Grand Cru Brut Reserve Champagne

Mailly Grand Cru Brut Reserve Champagne

I hope your New Year’s Eve toasts all come true, and hope you toast with some of these French sparkling wine options. These and the other budget friendly sparkling wine options I recommended on CBS this week are available at Total Wine. You can follow Total Wine on twitter, and find their website on their profile.

Let me know what you serve this New Year’s eve!

 

Toasting The New Year On A Budget

Instead of Champagne toast New Year's Eve with these budget friendly Sparkling Wines

Celebrate New Year’s Eve with Sparkling Wine

Looking to toast to your family and friend’s good health and happiness this New Year’s Eve, but not spend a fortune? There are plenty of sparkling wine options available if you don’t want to splurge for Champagne. I visited CBS 12 and chatted with Eric Roby and Michele Wright to talk about three sparkling wines under $13 that are perfect for ringing in the New Year, or any time!

While the Gruet family started off making Champagne in France, in the 70s they migrated to New Mexico, and after meeting other European wine makers, started making sparkling wine. Over 4,000 feet above sea level, their vineyards are cool at night, prolonging the growing and ripening periods, offering great fruit for their various sparkling and non-sparkling wines. The Gruet NV Brut costs only $12.99 at Total Wine, and many other wine retailers, but doesn’t lack the flavors of more expensive bubblies. Made from 75% chardonnay and 25% pinot noir, this non-vintage sparkling wine offers great flavors of green and yellow apple, with slight toasty notes.

Gruet NV Brut Sparkling Wine For New Years

Gruet NV Brut Sparkling Wine For New Years

If you like more dry styles of sparkling wine, Cava is a great option. With less fruit and more tart flavors, the Conde de Caralt Brut is a good option at $7.99. Made by Freixenet, I like the dry, tart style of this sparkler. There are some notes of apples, and some citrus, but the fruit is very faint. This is a good sparkling wine to mix cocktails, especially if you like making mimosa as it doesn’t end up being too sweet! Cava generally has a budget focused price point, and I’ve recommended Rondel cava in the past.

Conde de Caralt Brut Cava

Conde de Caralt Brut Cava

Prosecco is a light, delicious sparkling wine style from northern Italy. From Treviso, located in the Veneto region of Italy, the Luna d’Or Prosecco is made of Glera grapes. For $12.99, this refreshing sparkling wine has fruit forward flavors of melon, apricots, and citrus, and is perfect for those who like a little more fruit in their sparkling wines. Prosecco is a great option for a toast on New Year’s Eve. I’ve recommended Lemberti’s Prosecco in previous New Year’s Eve segments!

Luna d'Or Prosecco for your New Year's party

Luna d’Or Prosecco for your New Year’s party

Check back later on, as I’ll be posting another CBS 12 segment on French sparkling wine and Champagne that won’t break the bank. I’ll also have some other options for bubbles that I’ve had in recent weeks that have been fantastic, such as the Barons de Rothschild Champagne that for $99 at Total Wine is a great classic Champagne from a prestigious producer.

Glasses for Champagne

Which Glass is Best For Champagne?

Which Glass is Best For Champagne?

Whether you are serving Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, or a sparkling wine from California, you have probably asked “What is the best glass to serve Champagne in?” While there is no “Perfect Glass for Champagne”, I’ll break down three different stemware options, and give you the pros and cons of each. You can then pick the right glass for Champagne, one that suits you!

Are flute glasses best for Champagne?

Are flute glasses best for Champagne?

The flute glass is perhaps the most popular glass for serving Champagne or sparkling wine. Tall, thin, and elegant, it fits in with any Champagne toast, whether New Year’s or New Baby! The flute glass will preserve your Champagne bubbles the longest of any glass, so if the bubbles in your bubbly are extremely important, then this is definitely the glass for you! While there are  pros of this glass, it’s timeless style and it’s ability to preserve the bubbles longest, there are still some cons. The first is that they don’t really allow you to smell the sparkling wine, which is a big component of taste. Additionally, some folks find that pouring bubbly into a glass like this causes them to pour a bit too quickly, and the glass bubbles over. Other than that, it’s a great glass for Champagne. This glass is what I prefer my sparkling wines in. Robin, however, prefers the coupe glass for her Champagne.

Are coupe glasses best for Champagne?

Are coupe glasses best for Champagne?

There are stories that the coupe was modeled after Marie Antionette’s breast. Since the glass was fashioned in 1663 for the English aristocrats, that is probably not true. However, the coupe is an elegant and classic way to enjoy sparkling wine. The glass has a low profile, and a wide bowl. While it does allow your nose to inhale the bouquet of the wine as you sip, there is a major downside to this glass. The coupe is notorious for allowing those precious bubbles to escape quickly. So, while it may show up in timeless movie classics as the glass to toast New Year’s Eve with, it may not allow your bubbles to stay at the party as long as you do. Something to keep in mind while you sip your Champagne.

Can a regular wine glass work for serving Champagne?

Can a regular wine glass work for serving Champagne?

A regular wine glass works! Champagne is a mixture of chardonnay,  pinot noir, and pinot Munier, so it’s perfect for a regular wine glass. While it won’t be the epitome of class and sophistication the coupe and flute are, it works nicely to sip Cava, Prosecco, Champagne, or any California Sparkling wine from! So-pop a cork, grab the glass that fits your style, and toast to an amazing New Year!

Chilling Champagne Quickly

Celebrate on New Year's Eve

Celebrate on New Year’s Eve

With New Year’s Eve just a few days away, everyone is planning holiday parties. And, everyone is planning to serve a lot of Champagne, as well as beer, wine and other cocktails. However, you may not be exactly sure how to get all of those adult beverages cold, or keep them cold throughout the party. Here’s a nifty trick that will get your Champagne chilled quickly, and keep your sparkling wine cold.

All you need is a bucket, some tap water, ice, and table salt. And the libations to chill! Here’s a step by step guide to making a super cooler for your next party.

First, Fill a bucket about 1/3 with tap water. Obviously, if you have a lot of bottles to chill or keep cold, you’re going to need a bigger bucket. Here we’re just using a small ice bucket as an example.

How To Chill Champagne Quickly -

Fill a bucket about one third with tap water

Next add ice! I added 1 tray of ice here, but obviously you may need more, especially if you have a big bucket to fill, and keep cool all night. I would say you probably want a 10 pound bag of ice for every 3 to 6 bottles of Champagne you’re going to super chill quickly. More throughout the evening to keep it cold if necessary.

Chilling Wine Beer or Champagne fast

Add Ice to your water

For one bottle and one tray of ice, I added about three tablespoons of regular table salt. For a bag of ice in a bucket big enough to hold three or six bottles of Champagne, I would use about three-quarters of a cup of salt. Adding more won’t ruin the mixture. We’re not cooking, were chilling!

Add Salt to your iced water to chill your Champagne Fast

Add Salt to your iced water to chill your Champagne Fast

I recommend you don’t use your hand to stir the iced water. Your Super Cool Quick Champagne Chiller will be around 40 degrees in less than 1 minute. You may need mittens if you are stirring a big tub of iced water for your party!

Add Salt to your iced water to chill your Champagne Fast

Stir your salted ice water

The next step needs no comment – add the bottles!

How to Chill Wine Beer Champagne Fast

Add your Bottle(s) to your super cooled water

Obviously, with some more ice and a little more salt, this would have been colder, faster. I just did this quick experiement to show you how to chill your Champagne quickly. If I were cooling wine or beer or Champagne fast for a party, I would have a bag or two of ice in a cooler, and another in a large bucket to cool the wine first. Then, I’d add half a bag every thirty minutes or so. It never hurts to have more ice on hand, though!

Get your Champagne Cold Fast

You’re on your water to super cool

I hope your party is hot, and your Champagne is cool! Let me know if you use this tip to keep your sparkling wine, beer or even sodas cold this Holiday season!

Cheers!

 

A Perfect Gift For Wine Lovers

The SkyBar One Wine System

The SkyBar One Wine System

Finding the perfect gift for wine lovers is just a click away. The SkyBar One Wine system will help round out a wine lovers accessory collection. Just like an wine aficionado wants the right glass for their favorite wine, they also delight in having the right way to serve their wine. I was skeptical when I was first asked to review this nifty contraption, but after a week of using it, I’m a believer.

When I read the SkyBar One product info, I was unsure about receiving one of these wine systems for review. The device is meant to chill, pour, preserve and display your wine for up to 10 days. Frankly, there’s rarely leftover wine in my home to preserve. And if there is, I simply use a hand pump to vacuum the air out, and throw the bottle in my fridge. Why do I need something that, on sale, is $350, to do what a $20 device does? I almost declined the sample to review. However, I figured it wouldn’t hurt to see if this is truly a device a wine lover needs or not, and share my honest opinion.  I can honestly say I would love to be given the SkyBar One Wine System as a gift.

My first impression of the SkyBar One Wine System was not exactly the best. The box is a bit big, and the device stands 18 inches high by 8 inches wide and 12 inches deep. I have a tiny 1940s wood home, and extra space is at a premium. However, Robin said to set it on the side of my desk – as it looked quite handsome there. While setting up the SkyBar One Wine System, I felt some of the parts were a bit light, and hoped I wouldn’t break them. They weren’t flimsy, just not very hefty. I set up the system in about 10 minutes, and was ready to give it a run for it’s money.

Set The SkyBar One Wine System temperature by wine type

Set The SkyBar One Wine System temperature by wine type

The on-board computer and digital display are awesome on the SkyBar One Wine System. I love how easy it was to set the perfect temperature for my wine. It allowed me to select by wine type, or I could have set it to my preferred serving temperaturate manually. I did not wait around to see how long it took for my 75 degree bottle of wine from the grocery store took to get to the recommended 65 degrees for Cabernet Sauvignon. I ran some errands, and when I was back home a few hours later, the wine was ready to pour.

Setting my Cabernet Sauvignon to 65 degrees

Setting my Cabernet Sauvignon to 65 degrees

Testing the preservation of wine with a hand pump versus SkyBar One Wine System

Testing the preservation of wine with a hand pump versus SkyBar One Wine System

I decided to test the SkyBar One Wine System side by side with my $12 pump, and see how the wine stood up after a week. I bought two bottles of St. Supery Cabernet Sauvignon, to taste them side by side for 5 days and see if one bottle was better preserved than the other. There were some very interesting results.

Typically, we never allow a bottle of wine to sit open, pumped or not, for more than 24 hours. I find the taste of the wine degrades rather significantly, except in a few instances. To keep tasting a bottle pumped for a week was indeed going to be a challenge. On day one, the wines taste exactly the same, though the SkyBar One had the wine at a perfect 65 degrees, while my control bottle was much warmer. I pumped the control bottle and placed it in the fridge. Keeping it cool should stop the aging and oxidation process, holding the taste consistent for the test. Day two, however, had different results.

When the wine comes out of the fridge to test on the next day, it’s about 42 degrees, way too cold for red or white wine to drink. I let it sit out in the glass for about 20 minutes to warm, while I tested the SkyBar One wine. It was perfect, tasting exactly as it should and did on day one. Once the control glass warmed, I tasted it and while it was fine, there was definitely a little less oomph to the glass. On to day three, four and five.

The SkyBar One Wine System on my desk

The SkyBar One Wine System on my desk

I will spare you the process, and get down to the nitty gritty results of the SkyBar One Wine System versus the hand pump for preservation. Hands down, the SkyBar One rocked. The flavor of the control bottle was strained by day three, and by day four, I poured out the remaining half of the $26 bottle of wine. It was just done. However, on day five, the wine in the SkyBar One Wine System was still absolutely perfect to drink. I’m actually sipping on some now. I’ve gone through about half the bottle, as the pour system is very precise, allowing me to pour just a little bit each time. Aside from perfect serving temperature and longer preservation of wine, there are some great features of the wine system, as well as some drawbacks.

The Skybar One Wine System chills and preserves your wine, making it a perfect gift

The Skybar One Wine System chills and preserves your wine, making it a perfect gift

The SkyBar One Wine System not only can store your wine at the perfect temperature for serving, it makes it very easy to serve. Simply unlock the vacuum seal, press the pour button and you have a steady stream of wine to pour a taste, or a glass. The same on board computer that sets the temperature also ensures that your wine is vacuum sealed, even if you forget to click the PRESERVE button after serving. I know, because I forgot! There is also a filter on the end of the tube that draws the wine, meant to keep sediment out of your glass, and in the bottle. All great features for this fantastic device.

The drawbacks are few, but there. First, it only fits standard, 750ml wine bottles. This would be absolutely AMAZING if it fit the 1.5L magnum bottles. I would LOVE to be able to buy a few high end magnums and pour sips over the next 10 days for friends and family. Additionally, the device is meant to house standard, cork sealed bottles. While they offer an attachment for wine bottles that are screw-cap, they do not guarantee it will work with all bottles. However, there are few screw cap bottles of wine I want to keep around for 10 days, so I don’t see that as an issue.

You can find the Skybar One Wine System online, and at select retailers. Any wine loving recipient would be happy to receive this great device as a gift! Happy Holidays!